What People Used To Make In The Victorian Era When Someone Died Is Pretty Gross

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at 2016.02.03
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People living in the Victorian era regarded and treated death differently from modern times. Today, when death comes to those closest to us, it”s something unpleasant that we want to get over and move on from as quickly as possible. While this outlook certainly has its merits in our fast-paced world, the Victorians didn”t see it that way.

Death was a lot closer to everyone in Victorian times. Instead of dying in hospitals like many do today, most Victorians died at home. Because of the constant proximity to death, people developed their own elaborate rituals to honor death and celebrate the life of the person who passed away.

Perhaps the most elaborate ritual surrounding death in the Victorian era was the practice of making art and jewelry from the hair of the deceased.

Perhaps the most elaborate ritual surrounding death in the Victorian era was the practice of making art and jewelry from the hair of the deceased.

The hair was often turned into lockets, pins, necklaces, and watch chains like the ones pictured here, collected by the Hearthside House.

The hair was often turned into lockets, pins, necklaces, and watch chains like the ones pictured here, collected by the <a href=

Creating hair jewelry and decorations was a way for Victorians to remember their loved ones and keep them close by.

Creating hair jewelry and decorations was a way for Victorians to remember their loved ones and keep them close by.

Some wealthy families even had complicated wreaths created using the hair of their departed loved ones.

Some wealthy families even had complicated wreaths created using the hair of their departed loved ones.

These wreaths were usually framed and kept in the home.

Victorians were very religious. They believed they would see their loved ones again in Heaven when they died. This belief heavily influenced their attitude toward death.

Victorians were very religious. They believed they would see their loved ones again in Heaven when they died. This belief heavily influenced their attitude toward death.

Hair jewelry wasn”t the only kind of mourning accessory made from the dead. For this piece, someone had a ring made from the tooth of a deceased loved one.

Hair jewelry wasn

The Victorian era was indeed a ceremonial time when everything had its proper place, including death.

The Victorian era was indeed a ceremonial time when everything had its proper place, including death.

(via The Providence Journal)

While it might be shocking for us these days to imagine being that close to death, this was the reality of living in the time before modern medicine. Perhaps there”s even something we can learn today from this attitude on death.

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