This French Surgeon Was Called A Madman For What He Did To Human Corpses

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at 2016.01.26
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Some might consider Honore Fragonard to be a French artist with works that belong in the Louvre. Others say he was simply a madman with a twisted imagination. Regardless of your opinion on his work, you can”t deny that Fragonard did something decidedly different. His collection of “ecorches,” (flayed figures) continues to intrigue and horrify visitors at his museum in Paris.

Fragonard began his career as a licensed surgeon and veterinarian in the mid-1700s.

Fragonard began his career as a licensed surgeon and veterinarian in the mid-1700s.

After he was recruited to work at the world”s first veterinary school in Lyon, he began his morbid hobby of creating anatomical exhibits, as he called them.

The exhibits were carefully flayed human and animals bodies.

The exhibits were carefully flayed human and animals bodies.

Fragonard would dissect the bodies, preserve them through an unknown means, and then meticulously pose them.

Fragonard would dissect the bodies, preserve them through an unknown means, and then meticulously pose them.

In 1765, Fragonard moved to the newly-opened veterinary school in Paris. He brought his odd hobby with him.

In 1765, Fragonard moved to the newly-opened veterinary school in Paris. He brought his odd hobby with him.

For the next six years, Fragonard worked as the school”s professor of anatomy. In that time, he managed to complete thousands of his anatomical exhibits.

Not everyone enjoyed Fragonard”s disturbing hobby.

Not everyone enjoyed Fragonard

In 1771 he was expelled from the veterinary school amid rumors that he was a madman.

In 1771 he was expelled from the veterinary school amid rumors that he was a madman.

While this would have destroyed the confidence of most people, Fragonard continued on with his morbid work.

While this would have destroyed the confidence of most people, Fragonard continued on with his morbid work.

For the rest of his life, he sold many of exhibits to the aristocracy.

Fragonard”s works numbered in the thousands. Only 21 pieces remain today. They are all housed and on display at the Musee Fragonard d”Alfort in Paris.

Fragonard

(via New York Times)

Despite their shocking nature, there is something disturbingly beautiful about these creations. I think I”ll be taking a trip to Paris for my next super creepy vacation.

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